Joint Base Charleston   Right Corner Banner
Join the Air Force

News > Feature - Volunteers man JB Charleston Skeet and Trap Range
 
Photos
Previous ImageNext Image
JB Charleston Skeet and Trap
Retired Navy Captain Jean Van Slate, skeet shooting participant, releases two shell casings from his shotgun during a round of skeet Dec. 15, 2012, at Joint Base Charleston – air Base. The range is open to military and civilians but individuals without a military ID card are required to apply for a pass to get on base which requires a background check. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Senior Airman Dennis Sloan)
Download HiRes
Volunteers man JB Charleston Skeet and Trap Range

Posted 12/21/2012   Updated 1/10/2013 Email story   Print story

    


by Senior Airman Dennis Sloan
Joint Base Charleston Public Affairs


12/21/2012 - JOINT BASE CHARLESTON, S.C. -- The Joint Base Charleston - Air Base Skeet and Trap Range was established during World War II and is still run by volunteers today.

Lee Hunt, a World War II veteran, started the range after he completed his service in the Navy during World War II, and at 86-years old, he still helps run the range as a volunteer.

"The range was very popular back in the day and was originally used to train pilots on shooting moving targets," said Hunt. "Today the range is used for recreational purposes."

The range is run by 10 volunteers who live near the base and enjoy sharing their passion of skeet and trap with others.

"We hold one-on-one shooting classes here for adults and children," said Steven Selley, JB Charleston Skeet and Trap Range volunteer.

The range is open to military and civilians, but individuals without a military ID card are required to apply for a pass to get on base, which also requires a background check.

"We encourage people who have never shot skeet or trap to come and try it out," said Selley. "The range can be a fun family activity or for just a few buddies spending a little time in a friendly competition."

Participants can rent a shotgun from the range, but shooters must bring in their own ammunition.

The cost of a single round of skeet or trap cost $4, which entitles the participant to 25 clay targets.

"We have two skeet ranges and one trap range," said Selley. "I recommend that participants try both ranges to get a feel for the two games."

Skeet shooting uses shotguns to shoot and break clay disks that are flung into the air from two fixed stations at high speed from a variety of angles.

Trap shooting uses shotguns to shoot and break clay disks that are flung into the air at a high speed from one station.

The range is open Tuesday, Saturday and Sunday from 1 p.m. until dark. To set-up shooting time call 963-6137.

"The range is a great place to spend an afternoon with family or friends," said Selley.



tabComments
No comments yet.  
Add a comment

 Inside Charleston

ima cornerSearch


Site Map      Contact Us     Questions     USA.gov     Security and Privacy notice     E-publishing  
Suicide Prevention    SAPR   IG   EEO   Accessibility/Section 508   No FEAR Act